This is a coup

Life is a #beach…

Μια φωτογραφία που δημοσίευσε ο χρήστης Eugenia (@eatyourselfgreek) στις

So here we are Monday morning and I feel pretty wasted by doing nothing, my whole morning spent watching the news. I was sensible enough to get an early night yesterday and not wait for the Eurosummit to finish. They had been going for 17 hours (!). A deal has been finally reached but we are hardly any closer to something that resembles a solution to the much disturbing problems of Greece. Meanwhile, #Thisisacoup has been trending on twitter with 100 million tweets. Krugman is not alone to think they are killing the European project. What has stayed with me over the past week is a Business Insider article about Greece and how a left government is actually practising capitalism. Or to be precise trying, there is hardly a debt restructuring in sight. After having to #explainnotoschaumble we saw Tsipras going into negotiations under a very tense atmosphere. No-one expected negotiations would be easy, still no one could have possibly predicted how bad things could be. Back tracking to a deal people had rejected on the referendum, we started tweeting #explainnotoTsipras. Constantly under the pressure of being expelled out of the eurozone, #thisisacoup is what has been trending over the weekend, followed by lots of oops and ouch, thinking that Europe is divided, that it is collapsing. Is it? Hmm, I wander how worse could things get after this, pondering on how many points of the Maastricht treaty are actually being violated, mainly those of solidarity and sustainable development.

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As published by Unfollow

I am also keeping up with Dr Varoufakis, exposing the plans of Schauble which sum up to take Greece out of the eurozone, very sweet of Dr Schauble to care so much. As for the coup, I would encourage you to read a bit more on Reuters’ article: Anti-German backlash as social media tweets denounce Greece ‘coup’ and on the guardian #ThisIsACoup: Germany faces backlash over tough Greece bailout demands. Life over here does go on with high temperatures and lots of sunshine in Athens. Truth to be said I have developped quite a hard stomach watching debates one after the other and eurosummit update after eurosummit update. I am keeping my fingers and toes crossed and I made something super summery, a variation of the Cretan boureki: potatoes & courgettes bake. Here is what you will need:

boureki

 

Ingredients:

  • 3-4 potatoes, finely chopped
  • 6-7 courgettes, finely chopped
  • 2 ripe tomatoes
  • 150 gr feta cheese
  • 150 gr anthotiro, can be substituted with fresh cheese (queso fresco)
  • a small bunch of mint
  • salt and pepper
  • olive oil

boureki

  1. Place the finely chopped courgettes & potatoes on a baking tray and add on the olive oil, grated tomatoes with all their liquid, salt and pepper and mix well.
  2. Break both types of cheese in small pieces and sprinkle on top along with the finely chopped mint.
  3. Bake for 45 min to 1 hour at 180 oC in a fan assisted oven.

boureki

 

with love from Athens

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2 thoughts on “This is a coup

  1. Yvonne Payne says:

    Your dish is much tastier than that served up by the EU. I’m wondering if the new laws will actually be passed, I think their is a high probability that they won’t. However, if they do I predict massive strikes by people in industries identified for privatisation. By the way, I think such privatisation is overdue but my opinion dosn’t count. I’ll just say that whatever happens we will still be spending half of each h year in Crete. X

    • Eugenia says:

      Whether they will be passed it remains to be seen, honestly unpopular as these are I would not like to see an internal divide in government right now, or worse elections. As for privatisations, there is much change needed that is overdue and lots of work to be done in many sectors. Let’s hope it will be for the best. You should be counting days for your holiday now right?

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