Amygdalota of Mykonos

Sweet Greek flavours

Traditional Greek sweets always distanced themselves from gooey, melty chocolate or fluffy cakes. The sweetest pleasures are found bottled in crystal jars to preserve small bites of fruit from one season to the next, our famous ‘spoon sweets’ that are, in essence, wholesome marmalades. Along with fruit and vegetable preserves the next best thing is nuts. Walnuts and almonds grind their way into small delicious bites. There are many versions for baking these small almond or walnut based delicacies. For Mykonos, I chose amygdalota: fragrant almond based bites, dusted in icing sugar, a soft reminder of the white washed houses.

Head straight to the recipe.

Traditional Mykonian amygdalota require very few ingredients: almonds, eggs, sugar and floral water. This minimalism of ingredients is reminiscent of times less lush. In the dry, wind whipped Cycladic islands, scarcity of ingredients calls for resourcefulness and delicacies suffice in few but delectable ingredients. This is the case of Amygdalota, so popular in Mykonos. There are a handful of almonds, a bit of sugar, a fluffy meringue and fragrant rose water to lift the mix up. Execution of the amygdalota recipe however calls for the baker skills. Once the fine mix of ground almonds meets the meringue, oven temperatures should not be harsh on the oblong shaped cookies, but gently wrap them in heat to consolidate the mixture and bring out their fine flavours. Amygdalota are not overtly sweet, but rich in almond flavours and floral water. Greek coffee could not be in better company.

Ingredients (makes approximately 40 pieces)

  • 400 gr almonds
  • 100 gr sugar
  • 2 egg whites
  • 50 ml floral water
  • Icing sugar for dusting

How to make them: 

  1. In a food processor, grind the almonds with the sugar until their texture resembles a fine powder. It’s best to grind them in small batches.
  2. Beat the egg whites into meringue.
  3. Add the meringue to the powdered almonds and sugar and mix gently to incorporate.
  4. Form small, almond shaped balls with your hands and layer them on a baking tray.
  5. Bake at 120°C for 20-25 minutes.
  6. Spray them with floral water as soon as they get out of the oven and let the amygdalota cool down.
  7. Once at room temperature, roll in icing sugar to coat.

I hope you enjoy amygdalota as much as I do. Drop me a line when you make them.

From Mykonos with love,

Eugenia

PS: This Mykonian amygdalota recipe has been photographed for Greek Flavours and first appeared in their website, you can find them here.

 

Facebooktwitterpinterestinstagramby feather

Mykonos Chora and Onion pie, with Panayiotis Menardos from M-eating

What is the first thing that springs to mind when you think of Mykonos? Windmills! Along with whitewashed houses, tiny mazelike alleyways and of course, partying! I had many a stroll downtown both during the day and night. I am amazed of how easy it is to lose your way, yet it will never frustrate me. There are some great nukes and corners to discover whilst strolling around. One of my favourites places, M-eating, it’s all about modern Greek fusion cuisine.  Read on – there is a traditional Mykonian Onion pie at the end. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterpinterestinstagramby feather

A trip to Ghent, Belgium

City of bikes, beers and fries

I was in Ghent last week. If you follow my Instagram or Facebook you have probably already noticed what an interesting place Ghent is. For me, Ghent is one of the most beautiful cities I have ever visited: small enough to walk it, interesting enough to never get bored. There is no recipe in this post, but many pictures of Ghent instead and a few words on what delicacies you can enjoy when in Ghent. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterpinterestinstagramby feather

Athens city break

One wonderful day in Athens

The Parthenon & Lycabettus hill, walking in Athens

Most of the people who visit Greece, usually fly to Athens. Be it at the height of summer, when Athens is swarming with visitors making their way to the islands or during winter, when mild weather and winter sun will help you recharge your batteries. However, it’s no secret that the best time to enjoy a crowd-free capital is in the autumn and spring. No matter which time of the year you choose to visit, the fact is you will be spending at least one day in Athens. For me, Athens is certainly worth visiting longer than just for a quick weekend break but it is so often the case that busy people have little time on their hands. So, how do you spend your day when you only have 24 hours in Athens? Here are a few suggestions to get you started: Continue reading

Facebooktwitterpinterestinstagramby feather

London calling, Maltby street market

a very chilled food market

img_7370

Leaving London in the evening by plane is trully a treat. The Thames forms a sleek black ribbon with white glistening lights along its banks. Tiny red dots mark the sky-high peaks of The City and whilst you gaze down at the scenery, you are oblivious to how busy and loud London can be. And how very toothsome, tasty treats are hiding in every corner.

Continue reading

Facebooktwitterpinterestinstagramby feather

To Limani and a few words on Greek fish taverns

 palaia Fokaia Greek fish taverns @eatyourselfgreek

I have many friends who visit Greece for holidays. More often than not this would be an escape on the islands, be it glamorous Mykonos, romantic Santorini or a chilled road-trip to the Peloponnese. Of course Athens will be kept for the prized city break of winter sun. If you are a first timer you are certainly going to keep yourself busy in the center, hopping from museum to museum and strolling in the center of Plaka. But what do Athenians do on their weekend?
. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterpinterestinstagramby feather

Kastraki and a mushroom tart

IMG_2974

Just next to the town of Kalampaka, you find Kastraki. Kastraki is a small village, nested under the rock pillars of Meteora, almost forgotten by time. I left the car behind and went on a short hike towards a lonely rock, called the spindle. The views were amasing and because a hike, albeit a virtual one gives you an appetite, there is a mushroom tart too! Continue reading

Facebooktwitterpinterestinstagramby feather

Meteora cliffs and tips

FullSizeRender (3)

You might have already read my highlights on what there is to do and see in Meteora. In my long weekend in Kalambaka, I managed the Monasteries, I survived the hike and I had amazing food, including a truffle hunt. I had so many photos, I just about managed to process them all. The best of my snaps are gathered here along with some tips on sight-seeing in case your are heading up to Meteora, too. Continue reading

Facebooktwitterpinterestinstagramby feather