Ekmek kataifi

Divine pleasures, reloaded

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Ekmek kataifi is one of the most lavish amongst traditional Greek desserts. Sweet, yet not too sweet, creamy yet not too rich and as airy as fleeting fluffy clouds on a spring morning. The way its different textures and levels of sweetness combine will have you going for a second helping or perhaps a second tray. Continue reading

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Walnut cake, the Greek way – karidopita

A very juicy walnut cakekaridopita

When it comes to Greek names Michalis, Mike comes just after Yannis, Nikos and Kostas in popularity. Last Sunday was a big name day – one third of Greece must have been celebrating their Michaels and Michaelas. I was celebrating a very special Michalis too, my dad, and he has a a special request, karidopita, Greek walnut cake with syrup! Continue reading

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Leek pie and kourkoubinia

Smart ways to make your ingredients go a long way

kourkoubinia

Still on food blogging competition mode and all I think about is re-using. Last week I re-used my chickpea soup into chickpea burger, I had a few onions cooked into a sharp chutney and made my materials go a little further. This week, it is all about the pie and a bit of dessert, well, from leftovers fillo pastry. Making your ingredients go a long way, have something savoury and something sweet.  Continue reading

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Kataifi, divine pleasures

    Kataifi

As far as traditional desserts go, we have a soft spot for syrupy ones over here. In general we have a sweet tooth in the family and we are very fussy on what comes through the door. Dessert has to be perfect! Greek patisseries will never seize to surprise me with their selection of classics and also very innovative desserts. Be it chocolate gateaux, tiramisu, profiteroles or oriental delights, there is always temptation around. Of course every place has its speciality too, but I should come back to this on another post. Home-made, of course, always wins hands down. Continue reading

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baklava, with walnuts and almonds

baklava piece

Baklava is one of those delicacies whose origins are lost in time. Some trace it back to ancient Greek/Roman desserts with baked walnuts, almonds, poppy seeds, honey and dough from Athinaeus Deipnosofists; others draw a link to Byzantine pies, koptoplakous, as a baklava precursor; and some claim Assyrians to be the fathers of baklava (8th century BC).
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